Moving towards a circular food system: The Terrace presents at the Erasmus Food Lab

On the 26th of November The Terrace consultants Eva Schouten and Luca Goossens visited the Erasmus Food Lab in Rotterdam to give a talk on circularity and specifically a circular food system.

About the Erasmus Food Lab
The Erasmus Food Lab aims to set an example of sustainable food culture, bringing consumers, researchers, cooks and food entrepreneurs, and professionals together. At the Food Lab you find everything needed to accelerate (local) food transition: information and guidance for sustainable strategies, an organic vegetable garden, a collection point for local produce from farmers in the area, a  great spacious kitchen and many, many dedicated students that want to drive positive change.

Getting serious about food
When the delicious vegan dishes were ready to be served, we facilitated a session about key strategies for closing the loop in our broken food system. Creating urgency for the matter isn’t hard with facts that speak for themselves:

  • Currently, the agrifood industry is responsible for almost a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions globally
  • 1/3rd of our food is currently wasted
  • 24 million slices of bread are tossed out each day in the U.K. alone
  • In cities, less than 2% of the valuable biological nutrients in food by-products and organic waste is composted or otherwise valorized
  • At current consumption levels, we will run out of known phosphorus reserves in around 80 years, which forms the basis of the fertilisers used widely in agriculture

The solution hierarchy
Luckily, there are serious opportunities out there for turning the tide around. After all, the world’s best dishes were made from food leftovers, Pot au feu is made of waste vegetables, bouillabaisse is the fish that’s damaged or bruised or unmarketable for the moment. However, we didn’t come to talk about recipes – we are sustainability consultants not chefs. We presented the best ways to turn food waste into value based on the EPA Food Recovery Hierarchy and ages old circular farming methods like using manure as a fertilizer, functioning as phosphorous too. Food waste can for instance be used as animal feed, an initiative already widely applied in Japan, the feed is known to be rich in lactobacillus bacteria, which eliminates the need for antibiotics, and farmers save 50 percent of the cost of regular feed.

For the circular economy local communities are key
Cities across the world have a unique opportunity to spark a transformation towards a circular economy for food, given that 80% of all food is expected to be consumed in cities by 2050, as stated Ellen McArthur in their Cities and Circular Economy for Food report. Cities can, in connection with local farmers, spark the transition towards a circular economy. Creating a circular economy requires an industrial-scale response, but this can be complemented by a community-based response and associated physical infrastructure, such as maker-spaces, labs, community technology workshops and any other community-based forms, more about this in this insightful blog.  We left the event hopeful as the energy and amount of initiatives already initiated at the Erasmus Food Lab clearly show that they are well on their way to become such an accelerator for circularity. We hope to have provided them with some inspiration to take along on their journey!


Sustainable Fashion Innovations

Sustainable Fashion: The innovations that are (or might be) closing the loop

A while ago, it was Dutch Sustainable Fashion Week and that means that there were plenty of side events to visit to hear the latest on moving towards circular fashion, waste reduction new textile innovation. I joined in the Book Launch of Dana Thomas ‘Fashionopolis” at the Fashion for Good Centre on Tuesday. As for any event on sustainability, Dana Thomas started the night by facing us with numbers, and these are extreme enough to create urgency to act:

  • 20% of our water is depleted by the fashion industry
  • 99% of our clothes are not recycled
  • 85 percent of textiles end up in landfills
  • for 1 kg of cotton 1 kg of chemicals is used
  • we throw away 2.1 billion tons of clothing a year
  • 60% of all textiles used in apparel are derived from plastic (accounting for nearly 3 trillion plastic bottles every year)
  • it is estimated that about 35 percent of the microplastics that enter the ocean are synthetic fibers from clothing

The industry, generating no waste, and all textiles would be recyclable and are put back in the loop. More than ever, the industry is embracing this change with 90 apparel brands committing to the Circular Fashion System Commitment due June 2020 and set up by the Global Fashion Agenda. And fortunately, there are also some great developments to learn from that could fix the broken system of our current ‘fast fashion’ industry. Lately, a small but growing group of innovators are attempting tackle wastefulness and pollution in the apparel right at the source and large brands are taking note and start to invest.

Herewith an overview of the innovations that are seemingly taking apparel from ‘beyond business as usual’ to circularity in the industry:

Reduce

An increasing number of brands are eliminating problematic materials and dyes from the production process. Everlane, for instance, publicly committed to eradicating all virgin plastic from the company’s supply chain, stores, and offices by 2021.

There is a natural fiber and eco-textiles ‘revolution’ approaching. Made from organic waste, living bacteria, algae, yeast, animal cells or fungi, designers are growing biodegradable textiles (Algae Life, AlgiKnit) and shoe soles (Bloom Foam) and are creating environmentally friendly materials like genetically engineered leather (Modern Meadow), leather made from pineapple leaves (Piñatex), silk made from orange peels (Orange Fiber). It is a matter of waiting for these technological advancements to reach more scale.

Then there is the waste of rest material. In in our current fashion system, the shirts, trousers and blouses are developed in large amounts of numbers where many (average of 30%) never reach the consumer. For fashion brands this is a built-in waste and for our planet, it is a complete waste of scarce resources. In comes ‘producing to order’, made possible by vastly evolving technology coined as ‘SewBots’. Programmed knitting and sewing machines can make ‘one offs’, where the product will get developed after you have ordered it and will be designed with your exact measurements, leaving little rest material behind.

Reuse

Will owning clothes become a thing of the past? We can now lease our jeans at Mud Jeans, and hopefully more clothing items will follow. I believe it will not take long before we will find more and increasingly user-centric borrowing platforms and stores like Lena Library, Tulerie, and My Wardrobe HQ in the shopping streets and, of course, online.

Brands are investing in expanding the life of clothing items, like the repair and reuse program of Patagonia and Nudie Jeans, and are investing in the afterlife clothing and take back the products after they are used. And Eileen Fisher now buys back garments from customers at $5 each and reworks the material into new merchandise. This Renew program brings in $3 million of the company’s $450 million in annual sales.

Recycle

Lastly, the fashion industry starts to ‘waste’ into value. An increasing amount of relatively new brands are building their collections on recycled materials like Ecoalf (100% recycled materials from discarded fishing nets, plastic bottles, worn-out tires, post-industrial cotton, and used coffee grinds), Veja (introduced material called B-mesh (“bottle mesh”) that is made from recycled plastic bottles) and Girlfriend Collective (sports bras and leggings made from recycled plastic).

At the moment, many textiles are cocktails of different fibre materials blended together and separating fibre materials so that they can be recycled is a major challenge. It is therefore crucial that we start designing products and textiles for disassembly, with different components made from mono materials. Filippa K is setting focus on 100% recycled and 100% recyclable collections, with their Eternal Trench Coat. Wear2 incorporates seams that by using microwave energy make the separation of tags, labels, zips and other materials easy and inexpensive.

A game changing technology that now enables us to separate cotton from polyester has also came to the rescue. The polymer recycling technology of Wornagain can separate, decontaminate and extract polyester polymers, separate cellulose from cotton and non-reusable and turn them into new textile raw material. With such advancements we are able to do this over and over again and we no longer need our planets raw and scarce materials.

Bringing it together

Of course, closing a loop can’t be done by one stakeholder alone. Given that the idea of a circular economy is to create a loop of events, everyone in the supply chain carries responsibility for the shift to take place. 2020 is approaching and we need effective alignment in the industry to turn otherwise fragmented innovations into change at scale. I am hoping to see and hear about collaborative initiatives like Easy Essentials and the Design for Longevity platform to connect the apparel industry for circularity.

So, are you a stakeholder working in or with the apparel industry and do you know about collaborative initiatives for circularity? I would love to get in touch!


Greta Thunberg

What sustainability needs now, is connection and activation

Last week, I was touched deeply by Greta Thunberg’s speech at the United Nations Climate Summit in New York. Still, as a communication professional, I can’t help but wonder if her words will not work counterproductively. Shouldn’t doom thinking make way for an inspiring movement of which everyone wants to be part? Or can’t the one do without the other?

Doom thinking petrifies

The message of Greta’s speech is dark and disturbing. It’s so dark that, as a listener, I feel like there is nothing left for me to do. I feel like my only option left is to book a one-way ticket to a tropical island to party until the whole world falls apart. Doom thinking has a petrifying effect and fear will never be an incentive for positive change. Yes, fear sends us in a direction, but it sends us the wrong way. This is the main problem of the current discussion about climate change. The discussion visualises a world characterized by images of endangered polar bears on melting ice caps. Not a world that you want to be part of and which gives you inspiration and direction.

The question of guilt polarises

All who are conscious of our environmental problems and who are already making an effort to change their behaviour in positive ways, feel addressed by Thunberg’s speech. All the while, climate sceptics just feel more and more united and their joint aversion is strengthened. Lastly, there’s the biggest group right in the middle: the group that’s neither sceptic nor activist. This is a group of people who can still be inspired to become more aware to take action. You inspire them by identifying the problem, point out a spot on the horizon and suggest the first practical steps to reach that spot. You inspire them by connecting, not by polarising.

Create a movement that people want to be part of

What would it be like if, instead of Thunberg with her dark speech, there would have been five kids on the stage? Kids who would point out the problem and its disturbing facts, as well as paint a picture of the world they’d like to live in when they’re as old as the politicians present. Then, they all tell us about the first steps they’ve taken to get there; whether it’s a clothing swap, a plant-based diet, the decision to stop flying or stop using a tumble dryer. They would dare every politician to join them in taking the first step. No matter how big or small that step may be. These children would unite in the ‘First Step Club’: a movement characterised by hopeful visions and first steps.

No revolution without rebels?

We need Greenpeace to put subjects on the agenda and to get activated. Is this speech also an example of this? Does the bridge-builder need the rebel? In the case of Thunberg’s speech, I’m doubtful. What I do know is that I get my energy out of connection and activation. That is my first step. I take this step with my clients at every single job I do.

 


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Everything you want to know about a CSR / sustainability report

In this blog we help you on your way to make your first CSR or sustainability report.

Why would you make a sustainability report?

Did you know that large companies in the EU are even legally obliged to publish data on their sustainability performance? There are also enough internal and external reasons for other organizations to start reporting on CSR.

External:

  • Customers and partners increasingly expect transparency about sustainability objectives and performance;
  • Civil society organizations and future staff also want to know what is going on and what you stand for as an organization;
  • With a report you can tell where you stand, where you want to go and what you need for that. Nice starting point for dialogue with your environment.

Internal:

  • With an annual report you show all employees what has been achieved, and also where challenges still lie;
  • By involving people in drawing up the report, you also involve them more in the CSR strategy and its implementation;
  • External communication about objectives, successes and challenges increases commitment in the organization.

How long does it take to prepare a CSR / sustainability report?

You will certainly be working on a few months to prepare a CSR or sustainability report. This is not something you do in a few weeks. It also takes more time the first time. In addition, there are other factors that influence this. Consider the complexity, size and maturity of your organization. Where smaller organizations have a lead time of around three months, larger or complex organizations usually take longer. In general, most companies manage to complete the report between three and six months.

How to start?

Are you convinced to make a first CSR report for your company? Here are a few tips to make things a little easier for you:

  1. Divide the process in steps and make a good planning
  2. Think carefully about who exactly you need in which phase (for approval, data, photos and other content);
  3. Make a structure for the report in advance;
  4. And see reporting as a journey or a cycle. It goes and it gets better every year!

Want to know more?

Follow our Reporting training or contact our reporting specialist Marjolein via +31 (6) 12965895 or marjolein@theterrace.nl to provide your reporting journey or other sustainable project with positive energy and structure!


Why we believe that brave brands will lead the Fashion Revolution

Yesterday the Fashion Revolution week ended. The Terrace reflects on this global movement for transparency in the fashion industry.

The fashion industry calls for a revolution

It’s Fashion Revolution Week and yes, a revolution is what the fashion industry needs. Fast fashion is the second most polluting industry in the world, next to oil. Apparel and footwear industries currently account for 8 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions, only in 2015 the fashion industry consumed enough water to fill 32 million Olympic-size swimming pools and the dyeing and treatment of garments makes up roughly 17-20% of all industrial water pollution. Next to this environmental impact, apparel also comes at a social cost. According to the ILO, about 60 millionpeople are employed in the textile, clothing and footwear sector worldwide, and three quarters of these workers are women. In this way, the industry has served as ‘a stepping stone to development’ in many countries. Yet apparel also became widely known for its bad working conditions in factories, a lack of earning a living wage and even human rights violations. The collapsing of the Rana Plaza building in 2013, a building that hosted factories that worked for the world’s biggest fast fashion brands, was the final straw that accelerated a movement for change. The Fashion Revolution was initiated, an initiative that aims to accelerate collective action with worldwide campaigns that request/demand? more supply chain transparency of fashion brands.

Luckily, brave brands are taking the industry by storm

Well, that was quite some depressing news all at once right? Well, the good news is that many great things are happening. Entrepreneurs are stepping up worldwide, making a positive and sustainable impact the ‘purpose’ of their brand. At The Terrace we have worked with multiple ‘fashion revolutionists’ on strengthening their strategies for positive change. Whether they integrate sustainability in their business from the get-go or whether they turn their business model around, brands are getting serious about sustainability, and they are taking the market by storm. And to be frank, we believe the brands that change the status quo to be the only brands that will stay relevant. Why? Because consumers engage with the purpose of a brand more than ever and dedicating your business to the severe challenges the sector is facing, makes you matter more to your audience. Some brands that we believe are leading by example:

  • Good on You– This app rates thousands of fashion brands on sustainability
  • Mud Jeans– Innovative business model with circular jeans that you don’t need to buy
  • The Next Closet – Second hand designer products
  • Armed Angels – Challenges consumers on the true cost of fashion and incorporates sustainable textiles only
  • Veja– A brand continuously making their shoes more sustainable showcasing that sustainability does not happen over night
  • Reformation– Reaching the next generation of consumers with on trend recycled collections
  • Patagonia– Outdoor clothing brand that vows for anti-consumerism.

From individual commitments to an industry-wide movement

Brands play a huge role in turning the tide for the Fashion Industry, but alone they can only go so far. With the growing need for change in the sector, pre-competitive collaboration between companies, civil society and governments continues to grow. The Sustainable Apparel Coalition (SAC) is one of these examples, uniting retailers like Walmart and Patagonia and 200 other companies to assess their environmental and social sustainability throughout the value chain. The Fair Wear Foundation (FWF) enables member companies to assess and? improve workplace conditions. In 2017, The Fashion for Good centre opened in Amsterdam, which enables international brands, producers, retailers, suppliers, non-profit organisations, innovators and funders to work together in changing the fashion industry for the better. But also at country-level industry stakeholders are coming together to change the fashion business for the better. After the Rana Plaza collapse, the Dutch Agreement on Sustainable Garments and Textile  was initiated, a shared commitment  initiated by industry associations, trade unions, NGOs, and the National Government of the Netherlands to collaborate on many environmental and social issues in the garment sector.

Are you a company working in or with the apparel sector and want to create positive change?

There is a lot you can do. Addressing the challenges in the apparel sector and strengthening your business go hand in hand. Not sure where to begin? At The Terrace we are always happy to help brave organizations find their focus in becoming more sustainable, for instance with our Brand Purpose workshop. Get in touch with our team here if you want to know more.


Partnership for the sustainable development goals

You’ve probably heard to the Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations, also known as the SDGs or Global Goals. But how are these relevant to you and your organization? How is the Netherlands progressing on these goals? And how do different sectors contribute to the SDGs? Marjolein Baghuis of The Terrace organized an event for the alumni of Nyenrode Business University at the office of PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC ). The SDG's were the topic of this day.

Immerse yourself in the SDGs through virtual reality

PwC Amsterdam built an SDG dome to bring the SDGs closer to its staff and clients. On March 29, 2019, PwC Amsterdam opened the SDG dome to the alumni of Nyenrode Business University.

The United Nations strive to achieve these goals by the year 2030. In the dome we tried to achieve the the Sustainable Development Goals as quickly as possible. Even for people with deep knowledge of sustainability, this proved to be quite a challenge. Our two teams achieved the SDGs by 2037 and 2044. These results and the impact of experiencing sustainability challenges and solutions through virtual reality raised the sense of urgency and the commitment to act in all of us.

Dutch organizations working on SDGs below the surface

At the launch of the SDG dome, PwC also presented research about the application of the SDGs by Dutch organizations. This shows that listed companies in the Netherlands embrace the SDGs, but that these have not been integrated effectively into the strategies and activities. A smaller subset of the Dutch ministries and municipalities refer to the SDGs but is not yet leading to different actions. Social enterprises and NGOs in the Netherlands hardly mention the SDGs at all in their annual reports. They do not see a sufficient added benefit to link their impact to the SDGs. So, below the surface, things seem to be moving, yet organizations could still make much more use of the SDGs. Linked to their operations, their impact in society and as a common language to connect with other organizations.

Dutch organizations primarily focus on SDG 8 (decent work and economic growth) and SDG 12 (responsible consumption and production). While we should pay more attention to SDG 5 (gender equality) and SDG 13 (climate action), as international research by PwC shows we are lagging behind on these SDGs compared to other countries.

PwC brings the goals closer for clients and staff

Wineke Haagsma, Director Corporate Responsibility at PwC shared how PwC integrated the SDGs and how they help clients to do this as well. There is a four-step process to select the SDGs to which they want to contribute:

  1. Start from the positive contribution of your own organization;
  2. Then act on the negative impacts of your own organization;
  3. Focus on the positive impact of your products and services;
  4. and finally, search for the negative impacts in your supply chain.

These four steps help organizations identify which SDGs provide challenges and opportunities for the future, and to select the SDGs on which to focus. For the selected SDGs, the next step is to dig into the underlying targets. Make the selected SDGs very concrete for your own organization, with clear goals linked to your own operations. And with KPIs to measure progress. The SDG selector can be a handy tool to support this selection process.

Through this process, PwC Netherlands selected four focus SDGs and linked these to the strategy. On their website, you can read more about the selected SDGs (8, 10, 12 and 16). Wineke’s enthusiasm and openness sparked many people to really consider how to get to work on the Sustainable Development Goals.

Plant-based networking

As always, these alumni events are wrapped up with networking drinks. PwC served organic wine and vegetarian snacks made from mushrooms grown on coffee grounds from PwC’s own offices.

This event was organized and chaired by Marjolein Baghuis of Change in Context, in her role as Chair of the Alumni Circle for Sustainability at Nyenrode Business University. 

This blog of Marjolein also appeared on the website of Nyenrode.


Circular Event Nyenrode, Interface, Government

Interface and Dutch government go circular!

Planet Earth is a beautiful circular business model. From which we can learn as people and organisations. Linear business models have dominated our global economy in the past centuries. Yet it has devastating effects such as the depletion of finite resources and the creation of waste, which either needs to be stored or ends up in the environment. In the circular economy, we reuse all primary resources and residual materials. Renewable sources provide all energy used. A growing number of companies and other organisations are starting to see the benefits of circular business models and are joining in!

On January 29, 2019, I had the opportunity to facilitate an interactive session with an audience of Nyenrode Business University alumni after listening to Geanne van Arkel, Head of Sustainable Development at Interface (and Dutch CSR Manager of the Year 2018) and Martie van Essen, Program Manager Sustainability Acceleration at the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs share their stories about working more circularly.

What’s the business case for ending life on earth?

Ray Anderson, founder of carpeting company Interface would ask people this question when they asked him about the business case of working more sustainably. After reading The Ecology of Commerce by Paul Hawken he completely changed the course of his company. He became convinced that, as humanity, we need to learn from nature and we need to stop using fossil fuels. In 1996, Interface launched Mission Zero, the ambitious plan to no longer have a negative impact on the world by 2020.

Through Mission Zero, stock-listed Interface progressed in various areas. Compared to 1996, by the year 2017, Interface reduced:

  • Its greenhouse gas emissions per unit produced by 96%;
  • The use of water per unit produced by 88%;
  • The CO2-footprint of carpet tiles by 66%;
  • The energy used per unit produced by 43%;
  • 88% of the energy used comes from renewable sources;
  • and 58% of the materials are either recycled or bio-based.

The circular approach also yielded added value in other areas: costs came down, the reputation grew, innovation rose, employee and stakeholder engagement grew and the company became more future-proof. Because 2020 is almost there, Interface launched a new mission: Climate Take Back. It’s objective is to not just eliminate the negative impact but to also contribute positively to the recovery of our planet. Interface doesn’t confine the circular economy to its raw materials; it’s all about new business models, innovation and inspiration as well. An inclusive business model supplies part of the yarns from damaged fishnets from the Philippines and other places. With a great bycatch: H&M and other carpeting companies are also sourcing circular yarns which the supplier created at the request of Interface!

Practice what you preach on circular business

Through different programs and regulation, the government stimulates Dutch companies to work in more sustainable and more circular ways. And what does the government actually do itself? With 111 thousand FTE, 10% of all Dutch offices and € 12 billion purchasing power per year, the national government has an enormous impact. And with that the opportunity to drive change. The purchasing power is actually € 72 billion is we add regional governments’ and municipal budgets.

The program Think Act Sustainable (Denk Doe Duurzaam) delivers nice results. The national government’s annual report shows that in 2017, compared to 2016:

  • Energy use per square meter of office space decreased by 12%;
  • CO2 emissions decreased by 9%;
  • And an online marketplace for used office furniture saved € 7.4 million.

As much as possible, the government buys refurbished (circular) copiers, reuses its ICT devices, and the army reuses clothing or fiberizes it to recycle it to towels. In the offices, people are encouraged to reuse their paper cups during the day. Cups collected after use are recycled into toilet paper. These measures also deliver cost savings. For example, the army saved € 500 million by reusing clothes. Yet at the same time, circular and sustainable ways of working also raise dilemma’s within the government. Sometimes the scale of what the government needs provides a barrier. For example, there isn’t one supplier which can provide enough circular copiers. And sometimes the switch to new and different business models can require an upfront investment – funded by taxpayers.

A circular dot on the horizon, yet both feet on the ground

After these stories, the audience got on its feet to engage with the speakers and each other by Marjolein Baghuis of The Terrace. On the basis of our “Take a stand icebreaker” – they literally had to take a stand in respons to various statements about the circular economy. I really enjoyed facilitating the discussions among the audience and with the speakers. Everyone was convinced about the need for more circular business models. And everyone had the ambition to work in a more circular way.

Yet there were also plenty of doubts about the willingness and abilities of their organisations to really get going. Everyone expected a large role from the government, through its own actions as well as support and regulation for companies. At the same time, there was a passionate plea from the group not to wait for the government to lead; to just get started. Everyone agreed that this transition requires visionary leaders. Over drinks, we continued to discuss what roles we’d like to take up personally in this exciting field.

Circular Event feb 2019

This event was a co-production of the Nyenrode alumni circles for Sustainability and Market & Government following up on an earlier event about the energy transition. An inspiring Mindspace location in central Amsterdam hosted the event. Marjolein Baghuis was a guest at the Circulair Event, where the Nyenrode alumni were told how Interface and the Government work more circular.


Are you brave enough to take a stand?

Being brave can be terrifying: standing up for what you believe in, exposing yourself to the danger of being laughed at and criticized… That is why, when we support our clients to build a brave brand, we always start with a small but incredibly important step: creating a safe space to take a stand.

Brave starts small

A great way to encourage people to be brave is through the “Take a stand” icebreaker. We often use this exercise in our workshops or stakeholder dialogues, with the goal to support a safe conversation, where people open up to each other and feel comfortable to show what they stand for.

We get the room off their seats, clear the space and place colored dots on the floor. Green stands for “I totally agree” and red for “I totally disagree”; everything in the middle is an imaginative spectrum. The most important step is carefully preparing and selecting provocative statements. We present the statements one by one and participants physically move along the spectrum to the spot that best fits their own stand. The moderator of the session moves around the room and asks people to share why they have chosen this position. This often leads to an interesting exchange of different arguments. After a few statements the group starts feeling comfortable to take a stand. The atmosphere is set for the rest of the session.

Taking a stand is easier than it seems

What often gets in our way when we want to be brave is that annoying voice in our head: “What if I’m not right? Will they judge me? What if I fail?”

As it turns out, what goes wrong here is that we focus too much on ourselves – on our own feelings and what others might think about us. But if we picture any of our childhood heroes or role models, one thing they most probably all have in common is their focus on something bigger than themselves. They have a purpose in life: from saving the world from evil villains, to extinguishing fires and rescuing kittens.

The big secret: don’t be selfish

So, shifting your focus to the outside might help you to be more brave and courageous, not only to take a stand, but to turn this stand into decisive action that makes real positive impact.

Brave Brands on the rise

Self-focused people might survive; self-focused companies won’t. Increasingly they are in the spotlights, with nowhere to hide. Brands can no longer afford to simply focus on selling; they are expected to solve real problems for their consumers and society as a whole.

A large brand report by Nielsen (2015) – where 30,000 consumers in 60 countries around the world were interviewed, shows that 66% of consumers would spend more on a product if it came from a sustainable brand. For millennials this percentage is even higher. Moreover, according to Horizon Media’s Finger on the Pulse study, 81% of millennials expect companies to publicly commit to sustainability.

More and more brands take these expectations seriously. For example Ben & Jerry’s (Unilever), an ice cream company that takes a stand on issues as peace building, refugees, climate justice and the LGBT community. Another great example is DSM, a food and materials multinational company that strives to contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals for zero hunger and affordable and clean energy for all. And have you heard of Tony’s Chocolonely? A Dutch company that sells delicious chocolate bars as a means to fight slavery in the cocoa industry.

What do these brands all have in common? They all focus on something bigger than themselves; they show bravery; they make bold decisions that are guided by a bigger vision; they have clear purpose of making meaningful, positive impact.

Bravery pays off

In a recent interview in the FD newspaper, Unilever Europe’s president Hanneke Faber reveals that Unilever’s brands that take a stand grow 46% faster than the rest of the company. In the US, Ben & Jerry's market share is now more than 35%! “By taking a clear position you might antagonize some customers,” says Faber “but the rest become your fans, and that pays off.”

So let’s start encouraging brave

Research carried out for the Brave Brand Rankings shows that brave companies are more likely to be innovative, have great work environments with supportive managers and engaged employees and have organizational structures that promote cooperation and break down barriers.

To encourage bravery we need to create safe spaces where people dare to take a stand; no matter which stand they take. Our tip: start small and encourage bravery around you. Why don’t you try out our “Take a stand” icebreaker during your next team meeting? You can download more detailed instructions here.

After practicing in your team meeting, have your brand take a stand. What is your positive impact? What is your purpose? How can you ensure everyone in the company is aware of that purpose and prepared to fight for it?

You can find out in these cases how we have helped some of our clients to take a stand: Ecover-Method “Brand strategy for the people against dirty”; Dopper “Crystal clear positioning for crystal clear water”; and Nutricia “Define the societal relevance of a baby food company”.

Ready for your next brave step? Sign up for our Brand Purpose Training. Or just pop in our office for a cup of coffee!


Tony's Chocolonely: Raising the chocolate bar for industry change

For years, I’ve been supporting chocolate – and change – maker Tony’s Chocolonely to create their annual report. My kids and my colleagues love that I work for them. Because I always return from meetings with their yummy chocolate in funky flavors. Their bars are a treat, but what inspires me most to work with them is their commitment to creating positive change in the industry. Here’s my take on their key ingredients for positive change!

Crazy people raising the (chocolate) bar

Positive change usually starts with frustration about an issue plus people crazy enough to doing something about it. And this ccompany started just like that. Investigative journalists were shocked to find out how much child labor and slavery there is involved in nearly all chocolate. In 2006, in an attempt to prove that it could be done, they produced 5000 bars of slavery-free chocolate. As this first batch sold out in just a few hours, they turned the experiment into a company.  The company tagline says it all: “Crazy about chocolate, serious about people.”

Partners towards a common goal

A shift to more sustainable business practices is needed at all steps along the chain. From cocoa farmers, chocolate companies and governments, to retailers and consumers. The people at Tony’s understand they cannot transform the cocoa industry by themselves. Tony’s therefore developed a roadmap towards its mission: “Together we make chocolate 100% slave-free”.

The roadmap engages five key actors in the industry to work towards this common goal:

  • Strengthen farmers to increase their income
  • Engage the largest companies in the industry to take action in their supply chains
  • Encourage retailers to leverage their buying power
  • Push governments to adopt and enforce legislation
  • Enable chocofans to raise awareness and spread the message

Scaling up for real movement

To really engage partners along the cocoa chain, Tony’s knows there needs to be a business case every step of the way. Its own story and success provide lots of inspiration to get different parties to act.

At the launch event for its 17/18 annual report that scale became very clear:

  • Over 5,000 farmers benefit from the special premium Tony’s pays, nearly 1,000 farmers are involved in awareness-raising activities to prevent unwanted child labor and slavery;
  • The Netherlands’ largest retailer Albert Heijn announcedit will use Tony’s principles of cooperation for 100% slave-free chocolate for its very successful private label chocolate brand Delicata. World leading chocolate manufacturer Barry Callebaut supports the change process;
  • 5,000 chocofans joined the party, over 8,500 people support Tony’s mission as Serious Friends;
  • And the brand became the market leader in the Netherlands with a market share of 19%. Net revenue grew by 23% to nearly € 45 million and a net profit margin of 4.5%.

Relentless ambition for chocolate and change

Nice numbers for a company that produced its first bar of chocolate just 12 years ago… But they know there’s still a lot of work to be done. Therefore, Team Tony’s continues to work – and party – very hard to increase its own impact by expanding the business to other countries and continuing to drive collaboration in partnership with many others.


It’s official: The Terrace is a B Corp! Time for celebration

What do The Terrace, Tony’s Chocolonely, Triodos Bank, Ben & Jerry's, Patagonia and Dopper have in common? We are all companies that are B Corp certified! At The Terrace we are extremely happy with this new status.

But what is a B Corp?

B Corp is an abbreviation for Benefit Corporation. The B Corp certification was set up in 2006 by the American non-profit organisation B Lab. The goal of B Corp is to redefine success in business by not only focussing on profit but also focussing on making a positive impact on the environment and society. In other words: ‘Using business as a force for good'.

Why did The Terrace become a B Corp?

The Terrace has always had the DNA of a B Corp. We were founded with the aim to help companies and organisations realize positive change. We have been doing this for eleven years already, through sustainability strategies and reports, branding, communication and stakeholder engagement. Our ambition is to inspire and activate brands and consumers to make better and more sustainable choices.

Leontine Gast (Founding partner & Managing director): ''I believe that B Corp provides an important framework for implementing positive change throughout the entire business. Moreover, it offers a network of like-minded companies with which we can take faster and larger steps towards a meaningful economy.''

B Corp doesn’t just evaluate a product or service; it assesses the overall positive impact of the company behind it. How sustainable are we really? After all, a good world starts with yourself.

That is why, in order to become a B Corp, you have to go through a strict 'impact assessment' with many questions about five key impact areas of governance, workers, community, environment and customers. We score the most points with our impact on the (local) community and workers, check our online B Impact Report for all the scores. To actually obtain the B Corp Certification, you have to score at least 80 out of 200 points. This seems easy, but it is not! Try it yourself by filling in the Impact Assessment for free.

No time to waste!

Once you are officially a B Corp it doesn’t mean you can sit back and relax. Every year, all B Corp certified companies have to prove again how much impact they make. The movement is rapidly growing which means it is currently very busy at the B Corp offices. And that’s great news! Currently there are 2655 Benefit Corporations in 60 countries around the world. In the Netherlands, there are already 66 B Corp certified organisations. Join in and be the change!