Dopper, on the verge of taking over the world: 'the bottle with a message'

If you haven’t heard of Dopper yet, you’ve probably stayed indoors with the doors and windows shut and the wifi disconnected. Dopper is the 'the bottle with a message': the recycled plastic water bottle that you can drink from without any form of guilt. This fun company is striving for some serious changes such as the ban of single-use plastic, clean drinking water for everybody and environmental awareness for a better future. That sounds like some big, hairy and audacious goal! 

After attending our Brave Brands Positioning Workshop and learning more about defining purpose and finding your brand's identity, the Dopper team called us for help. The organisation is in a huge transition and ready to take the leap to the next level. In the next couple of years Dopper will be entering new markets in several continents across the globe, with a particular focus on Germany. They wanted to be ready and feel 100% confident about Dopper’s brand positioning. For this the team needed to redefine their purpose and define who they are as a brand, and also, what they are not. 

New purpose. New power.

Together with the international team we created their new purpose. One that matches the dream of the founding fatherMerijn Everaarty and the Dopper change makers behind the brand. The challenge was to have focus and to not to be afraid of leaving important stuff out. After a few sessions with the team they noticed that by having focus, they gained a lot of clarity for their organisation. Everything seemed to come together. 

"Dopper wants to live in a world where we celebrate crystal clear waters." 

We created this new purpose to show the real reason behind the team’s motivation. Dopper  was found because of the frustration of our disposable lifestyle and the plastic waste that pollutes our beautiful waters. Dopper is striving for
as our drinking water and the oceans should be. The new purpose also shows the Dopper heart: it’s strong-willed but happy and cheerful, inspiring others to join and live the life we want to live: clean, healthy and happy.

 

Who is the messenger? 

After defining the purpose we’ve now embarked on an adventurous journey to find the brand personality. After a few sessions + the application of the Brave Brands Model, we’ve hit the jackpot! I cant disclose more info at the moment but you’ll find out soon ;)

Interested to learn more about the Brave Brands Model or how to find your brand’s purpose and identity? Please give us a call! We’d be happy to tell you more about it. 


Bioplastics: when innovation empowers abundance, La Coppa

Plastics are indispensable to our daily lives. They come in every colour and shape, light, strong, resistant, tremendously useful for every person and industry. Plastics have come to stay.

The vast majority of plastics are oil-based. Around 4% of the oil that the world uses every year goes into producing plastics. Their composition has been both its strength and its weakness. The challenges of climate change and fossil fuel scarcity are putting the plastics industry under pressure. In addition, the ever-growing and widespread plastic waste problem is no longer possible to ignore.

In this setting, bioplastics are a great alternative allowing both for high-quality performance and widespread use while having a reduced environmental impact.

Bioplastics are totally or partly made from biomass (plants), mostly corn, sugarcane or cellulose plant fibers. Although there are several varieties of bioplastics, only a few are fully made of renewable, natural resources. The 100% plant-based plastics are the only variety that at the end of their useful life will decompose into water, carbon and compost (i.e. are compostable/ biodegradable). Ideally, the decomposition will take place at an industrial facility and will be catalysed by fungi, bacteria and enzymes, leaving no toxic particles or harmful substances behind.

New materials such as PLA, PHA or starch-based materials create truly bio-compostable packaging solutions.

Closing the loop on plastics

Advanced Technology Innovations, a company that provides innovative packaging solutions for food and beverages, developed a system for coffee cups made of plant-based plastics (PLA), namely produced from the residue of sugarcane and sugar beet.

One of our clients, LaCoppa coffee adopted this innovation showing their leadership in sustainable packaging in the consumer goods industry.

The fully compostable coffee capsule can be used in espresso machines, proving that it is possible to replace petroleum-based and aluminium coffee capsules with a fully functional, more sustainable alternative that should be widely adopted.

     

Others leading the change

Many industries are already using bioplastics. Not only traditional industries, such as food packaging but also automotive, electronics and textiles. Several leading brands, such as Tetra Pak, Ecover and Danone are investing in new bioplastics solutions. Unexpected partnerships are also arising: Heinz approached Ford about possible uses for its tomato waste. Ford was already using bioplastics based on soy and coconut for its auto components, carpeting and seat fabrics; why not explore the use of ketchup bi-products to develop a more sustainable bioplastic material? Specifically, it is expected that this new bioplastic could be used in wiring brackets and material for onboard vehicle storage bins.

Work in progress

While great opportunities and fast growth await bioplastics, this is a work in progress.

For bioplastics to become a truly sustainable alternative both the industry and governments need to make technical adjustments to the current waste streams to allow for an adequate treatment of bioplastics. Otherwise these will end up in the landfill.

Engagement with the final consumer is also crucial to promote education on bioplastics and recycling. Consumers should avoid contaminating plastic waste recycling with bioplastics, as it will compromise the plastic recycling process.

Finally, in order to gain widespread support, the bioplastics industry should increasingly use food waste residues (from pineapple fibers to shrimp shells), non-food crops or cellulosic biomass, leading to decreased land-use demand by the industry. Innovative alternatives are endless.

The future of plastics

Biodegradable bioplastics are a growing niche market. According to European Bioplastics, the global bioplastics production capacity is set to grow 300% by 2018. This growth will lead to a new generation of plastics, where abundance of plastics is powered by innovation. Oh, and it is sustainable!


Scoping Mission of the Colombian Coal Sector, report for the Dutch Parliament

Responsible coal mining has become a major topic on the Dutch political agenda. For at least the next 15 years, coal will continue to be an important contributor to the country’s energy mix. Hence, the Dutch government is keen to support and strengthen responsible practices in the coal supply chain, in particular in the main sourcing country, Colombia.

At the request of the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Colombia, The Terrace and BSD Consulting were selected to do a “Scoping Mission of the Colombian Coal Sector”. The objective was to understand the situation on the ground in the coal mining regions of Cesar and La Guajira, where the operation of large-scale and open pit coal mining destined for export is concentrated, and to define the outline of a possible contribution of the Netherlands.

Our team travelled to Colombia to visit the mining regions and to speak to all relevant stakeholder groups (Colombian government, mining companies, labour unions, local communities, NGOs etc.). Over 50 interviews were undertaken to ensure that the defined proposal for a Dutch contribution is adjusted to Colombian reality and to local stakeholders’ needs. Many concerns were expressed regarding a large variety of social and environmental issues, influenced by a difficult political context with 50 years of internal conflict.

The Scoping Mission has concluded a contribution by the Dutch government to take on the social, environmental and labour challenges in the coal mining areas is feasible and desirable. This should be done in close cooperation with relevant Colombian stakeholders. The Scoping Mission recommends a contribution based in four possible work streams:

a. Mediation of a dialogue to solve conflicts between stakeholders;

b. Through continuous dialogue, encourage the Colombian government to be more proactive in addressing social and environmental challenges in the coal areas;

c. Support reliable and independent data collection of environmental and social impacts caused by local industrial development;

d. Support thematic projects that address pressing challenges in the mining region (e.g. to improve water management).

The final report has been sent to Dutch Parliament by Minister Ploumen (Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation), in preparation of the Minister’s visit to Colombia in late November. The report “Scoping Mission: Understanding the Context of the Colombian Coal Sector” can be downloaded here.


Planned obsolescence and a 3D printed solution

Here at The Terrace, we are dreamers, we are thinkers and we work hard for positive change. The process from idea to detailed action plan has many phases. Some start on a small bench in the park, others with a nice phone call or after an interesting meeting. But all projects have a moment where we gather in out meeting room for a joint brainstorm session. We have our notebooks, our critical remarks, we laugh, have intense discussion and we vividly visualize everything on our NOBO© Flip chart. Till the day came when the connection part between the writing board and undercarriage broke.

Without this small piece, the flip chart became more or less useless. If we wouldn’t be The Terrace we would put the remaining parts outside, next to the garbage for the Tuesday evening pick-up, buy a €200,- new one and happily go on with our lives. But we are The Terrace and also for in-house challenges we seek circular solutions. This is not a grand story how we saved the world, but it’s the story of how we repaired our loved flip chart.

We don’t give you life-challenging answers, but at least we hope to inspire you to see your office equipment in a different way and think again, before you throw it away. And maybe, during the process, we can raise awareness that the production of office equipment, and production in general could shift to a more sustainable and circular model.

And so our journey begins…

Fien started with the main office suppliers in the Netherlands; Manutan, Staples and Viking. They did not deliver the part we needed without the whole flip chart. We tried the repair service, mentioned on the NOBO© website. They only repaired their beamers. In the mean time we had also contacted the NOBO© Europe customer service. When their reply finally came it was a ‘not deliverable’. This was simply not acceptable. In a time where sustainability and resource scarcity are high on the agenda we couldn’t just throw away the old and buy the new, because simply one part, nevertheless essential, was missing? I shared my worries with the customer service and after ten emails and fifteen days they send a request to the factory in China to send a spare part.

We still did not have my connection part. Bummer. I also hadn’t sit still. Meanwhile I contacted 3D Hubs if they could maybe ‘print’ me a new part for my flip chart. Unfortunately I didn’t have a STL. file (which you need to print 3D), but they linked me to a company, Van Alles Wat Ontwerp, who could design the STL.file of my connection part and print it. So with a hopeful hart I send the broken part to Van Alles Wat Ontwerp.

Nobo2 Nobo3 

A week later we received, neatly and well fabricated our missing link of the NOBO© Flip chart. Now happily in use again.

But this keeps you wondering, doesn’t it? How can something so simple, be so complicated? Why don't companies repair services or spare parts? Most products have planned obsolescence, which means that they are designed to break down after a certain period. This cannot be the right way forward. We strongly believe that in rethinking your client journey, you tap into new business opportunities while lowering the stuff we needlessly throw out. WIN-WIN!

If you also have a broken connection part of the NOBO© Piranha Flip chart, please feel free to contact us for the STL.file, we love to share!

Feeling the fixing vibes? Here are some options for help:

Van Alles Wat Ontwerp – design & 3D printing
3D Hubs – 3D printing
Repair Cafe – Repair (almost) everything

Want to know more about planned obsolescence? This is an interesting item on ‘made to break’ by Economische Zaken from the VARA:http://ez.vara.nl/media/313730 (In Dutch)


Brand Purpose Model: what is the most beautiful thing you can do with your brand?

As a marketer your goal is to win fans and keep them. You do that by making a difference. And by showing what moves you. What you stand for. But what is the best way to get to the core of your brand?

Brand positioning models

Brand positioning models come in many different forms, from the brand diamond, the brand propeller, to the brand sun, etc. All magnificent one-page models that try to cover the essence of a brand. The truth about the brand, meant to be brief and guide colleagues and external contacts. Most are inspired by the brand key: the model developed by the Unilever Marketing Academy to consistently manage their brands internationally. Just one A4, containing all important information in nine clear bullet points. As a marketing strategist I see them in many shapes and forms: from boring Word documents to inspiring works of art. Accurately defining your brand is no easy task. It requires many decisions. Those decisions together define the strength of the brand.

Marketers and brand managers recognize the need for choosing a cutting edge position in the market. Who is the brand, for which target group are you always the best choice, and of course a razor sharp consumer insight. We can’t live without it.

Stand for something as a brand

If you ask me, the brand key is hopelessly worn out. In times like these, where what used to be rattles, we need the courage to let go of the old and embrace the new. The brand key is not sufficient anymore because it doesn’t take into account the world around the brand. Both the internal organization as well as the external stakeholders need to receive adequate attention. Next to the functional and emotional advantages consumers increasingly expect “like-mindedness”. Choosing for a brand that shares their values. A brand that doesn’t just stand for something, but also cares about something! And I’m not talking about a briefing that was sent to the advertising agency ordering to “come up with an authentic campaign”.

I believe that brands should decide on how they can improve and enrich people’s lives. How they can expose and contribute to social issues. Current position models fall short in addressing this.

We need an inspirational model that helps marketers to proudly carry their profession and helps companies to create true value. Brands have the power to encourage people to make better, healthier and more sustainable choices every day. Brands can help to redefine our vision on quality of life. Brands can guide us, by hitting the sustainable route. Brands can enthusiasm people for this route. They can trigger positive change in the behavior of people.

The Terrace’s ‘Brand Purpose Model’

As a warm-up we start with the question: “what is the most beautiful thing you can do with your brand?” Bam! It provides food for thought and breaks with the laws of conventional marketing mechanisms. This is your chance to think something about something, to be opinioned. Stand for something. And that is exactly what customers expect from you. That’s how you create preference.

The “Brand Purpose Model” by The Terrace offers companies a holistic view on their business to sharply define the purpose. In that process the marketer doesn’t just need his or her own team, but also colleagues from PR/PA, Sales & CSR are needed. Of course having the general director at the table is highly desirable. Without connecting these different disciplines, no shared “purpose” will arise in the organization. Any social activity will just be a little something on the side. Your customers will see right through it.

How it works

We work from the outside-in. Based on insights and needs from different angles we determine the business value and the social impact that fits the brand. The target group and competitors follow next.

Of course you have to know who you’re up against in the market. However, successful brands create a cooperative environment. Take for example cooperation in the supply chain; for marketers, the transition from a linear to a circular economy means that your products will come from two sides, from you and to you. That’s not something a company can manage on its own. Cooperation is crucially important. This includes your target group, who has become more conscious and can arrange more things themselves. Granting others something is the key.

Everyone knows it, character can’t be copied. Why do so few brands of today show what they really stand for? A strong brand purpose provides focus for successful collaboration and innovation.

What does your brand stand for?

Leontine Gast


Reducing food waste: beautiful work for ugly fruit and veggies

The world loses or wastes one-quarter to one-third of all food produced for human consumption according to the estimates of the FAO and World Resources Institute. However it’s not only a waste of food. There are nearly one billion malnourished people in the world that would no longer be hungry with the 40% million tonnes of food waste by US households, retailers, and food services each year.

Besides we didn’t even mention the irrigation water to grow food at 200 litres per person per day that is wasted, the 10% of developed countries greenhouse gas emissions coming from food that is never eaten, or the occupied land currently used to grow unnecessary surplus and wasted food.

All this could be avoided on less than a quarter of the food that is wasted in the US, UK and Europe. A great number comes from stores discarding produce that doesn’t fit the standards of food beauty. But the third biggest supermarket in France, Intermarché, came up with a bright idea on how to get people to buy, and actually look for those ‘ugly’ fruits and veggies.

A few months ago they’ve launched their campaign called “les fruits et légumes moches”, or in English, the inglorious fruits and vegetables. We love this campaign, its beautifully designed ads, great PR, and the impressing results. Check out the video below for the full explanation, and let us know what you think.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2nSECWq_PE&feature=youtu.be


Baby you can drive my car: business opportunities in the sharing economy

A new economy is on the rise. A growing number of companies are gaining interest in an economy where collaboration is essential. This emerging economy has many names, from Collaborative Consumption to lease-society, from peer economy to maker movement. But it all comes down to the same thing: we share. This exchange is not only limited to tangible objects, but can also include the exchange of skills or services, for example a shared car drive.

Sharing is not a new phenomenon. But due to the Internet and other innovations the scale on which the sharing economy is operating is much bigger today. Where does this renewed interest in sharing come from and what are the opportunities for companies?

From hyper consumption to sharing economy

We live in a predominantly capitalistic society. Our way of consuming is based on a fascinating system. In order to sustain itself, it needs to grow. In order to grow, it needs to be fed with more consumption. Psychologically it works like this: people want to own more as they acquire more, which is of great convenience for business, they’ll produce and sell in an equal pace. Within the past century, we saw the unprecedented rise of individual property, credit, and commercials. Together they resulted in a system of hyper consumption.

Entering the 21st century - certainly after the start of the economic crisis of 2008 - we see a shift from a consuming, individual society to a culture where a growing number of people are starting to collaborate. During the crisis, people began to lose their trust in large organizations who seem to appear only as greedy, hungry monsters only looking for one thing: profits. The new emerging economy offers a new perspective to these people. Shared access overrules individual ownership, reputation is the new credit and commercials are replaced by the quality of the community. These three pillars are the basis of the Sharing Economy.

Shared access

In the sharing economy, it’s about ‘access’ over ownership. We have to make a mind shift, instead of owning a product; we’re using the services a product provides. In other words, we don’t need the light bulb, we need the lumen. Like mushrooms in autumn, companies with a sharing philosophy pop up everywhere. On the popular platform of Airbnb, people rent out their spare room, air mattress or backyard tree house to visitors. On peerby, neighbours lend out their toolkits. Do you need advice on your business plan, or do you want to learn Spanish? Konnektid will connect you to a person who can help. And for easy transport, you can always borrow a car via Snappcar. These platforms offer consumer-to-consumer sharing services. A typical B2B platform is Floow2, where heavy construction vehicles and business equipment are being shared. B2C platforms, such as Netflix, see their list of customers grow. Important in the sharing economy is your community or network. The bigger it is and the more whufffie you have, the more access to goods, skills and services are being offered. Which leads us to explore the whuffie-factor.

 Share stuff, gain whuff!

You probably wouldn't lend your car as easy to a stranger as you would with your garden tools. In essence, the exchange comes down to a relation of trust. Trust is mainly build on the reputation of both the lender and the borrower. In the sharing economy, reputation is your capital: it’s social capital. And its’ currency is called Whuffie. Whuffie originates from the book Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory Doctorow. In this novel, money no longer exists and people pay with whuffie. Whuffie is obtained through sharing goods, skills or other services. The good thing is: the more you share, the more whuffie you receive. For companies, social image or whuffie is just as important. Examples of companies who have already joined the sharing economy are Bosch, with a leasing model for washing machines and refrigerators, and Achmea, who have started their own sharing initiative: WeHelpen.

Community

Whuffie is a strange currency because it’s not directly visible. It is measured only in your relation to other people. You need to build a community of trust with the people or companies around you. Only trying to sell your product will not work. You will have to reach out to your customers and make a real, long-term connection, for example through a leasing system or after-sales services, so they will come back. But also think of the numerous opportunities there are online. The web is getting bigger and bigger and there are an increasing number of websites and apps that offer sharing opportunities all around the world. The sharing economy is a local community on global scale.

Together, we have created a glocal community where people can share items, save money and have more contact with each other, online but even better in real life. For companies, the sharing economy has created new markets via access versus ownership; it sparked the consumer mind-set of we and together instead me, me and me; it has extended customer relationships from ‘point in time’ to ‘point across time’ and created word of mouth through a user community.

The sharing economy is growing. Not only new individuals, but also institutions as the municipality of Amsterdam (Amsterdam Economic Board) and Brussels have shown interest and discuss the possibilities of how to best facilitate the sharing movement. This shows that the sharing economy is not just a flash in the pan but is here to stay.

Author: Fien, intern at The Terrace. In the coming months, she will submerge herself into the world of the sharing economy.


Black Friday: because shopping is fun, but should it be greener?

In Europe we look with wonder at the millions of Americans who line up in front of Walmart to get their hands on a good bargain the moment grandpa puts down his fork after a convivial turkey dinner. ‘Black Friday’, the day after Thanksgiving, marks the official start of the holiday shopping season in the United States. Retailers use the hype created around the tradition by offering appealing discounts that move consumers to camp outside of stores waiting for the early openings. This year, the National Retail Federation estimates 147 million Americans will start their holiday shopping during the Black Friday weekend, boosting sales of retailers who hope to clime out the red numbers into the black.

So what exactly is moving American consumers to give up their precious night’s sleep and spend hours on end queuing up to spare a few bucks? Fact is that for many, bargain hunting the day after is just as much of a tradition as the turkey and pumpkin pie on the night before. The rush of finding that two-for-one and being able to give your family members that extra special present under the Christmas tree can be a truly satisfying experience.

However, not everyone is thrilled about the exorbitant expression of American consumerism that heralds the holiday season every year. Reoccurring stories about fights and stampedes of frenzied shoppers have led to a somewhat tainted reputation of the tradition. In recent years, retailers themselves have become the cause of resentment due to their decision to move up opening times to 9 and even 8 p.m. on Thursday, nibbling their way into the sanctity of Thanksgiving Eve. Both employees and families are starting to grow weary of the relentless efforts of retailers to maximize their profits at the cost of family tradition.

The upside to all this fuss is that an increasing number of citizens and companies are seizing the discussion about Black Friday as an opportunity to push for positive change. Last year, Patagonia published their surprising and inspiring “Don’t Buy This Jacket” ad on Black Friday, encouraging consumers to think about the environmental impact of their behavior. This year, too, the call to use Black Friday as a moment to vote with your money and choose for sustainable alternatives is growing louder.

That definitely sounds good to us. Almost as good as a slice of pumpkin pie.

Written by Leontine Gast and Jacobien Crol