Are you brave enough to take a stand?

Being brave can be terrifying: standing up for what you believe in, exposing yourself to the danger of being laughed at and criticized… That is why, when we support our clients to build a brave brand, we always start with a small but incredibly important step: creating a safe space to take a stand.

Brave starts small

A great way to encourage people to be brave is through the “Take a stand” icebreaker. We often use this exercise in our workshops or stakeholder dialogues, with the goal to support a safe conversation, where people open up to each other and feel comfortable to show what they stand for.

We get the room off their seats, clear the space and place colored dots on the floor. Green stands for “I totally agree” and red for “I totally disagree”; everything in the middle is an imaginative spectrum. The most important step is carefully preparing and selecting provocative statements. We present the statements one by one and participants physically move along the spectrum to the spot that best fits their own stand. The moderator of the session moves around the room and asks people to share why they have chosen this position. This often leads to an interesting exchange of different arguments. After a few statements the group starts feeling comfortable to take a stand. The atmosphere is set for the rest of the session.

Taking a stand is easier than it seems

What often gets in our way when we want to be brave is that annoying voice in our head: “What if I’m not right? Will they judge me? What if I fail?”

As it turns out, what goes wrong here is that we focus too much on ourselves – on our own feelings and what others might think about us. But if we picture any of our childhood heroes or role models, one thing they most probably all have in common is their focus on something bigger than themselves. They have a purpose in life: from saving the world from evil villains, to extinguishing fires and rescuing kittens.

The big secret: don’t be selfish

So, shifting your focus to the outside might help you to be more brave and courageous, not only to take a stand, but to turn this stand into decisive action that makes real positive impact.

Brave Brands on the rise

Self-focused people might survive; self-focused companies won’t. Increasingly they are in the spotlights, with nowhere to hide. Brands can no longer afford to simply focus on selling; they are expected to solve real problems for their consumers and society as a whole.

A large brand report by Nielsen (2015) – where 30,000 consumers in 60 countries around the world were interviewed, shows that 66% of consumers would spend more on a product if it came from a sustainable brand. For millennials this percentage is even higher. Moreover, according to Horizon Media’s Finger on the Pulse study, 81% of millennials expect companies to publicly commit to sustainability.

More and more brands take these expectations seriously. For example Ben & Jerry’s (Unilever), an ice cream company that takes a stand on issues as peace building, refugees, climate justice and the LGBT community. Another great example is DSM, a food and materials multinational company that strives to contribute to the Sustainable Development Goals for zero hunger and affordable and clean energy for all. And have you heard of Tony’s Chocolonely? A Dutch company that sells delicious chocolate bars as a means to fight slavery in the cocoa industry.

What do these brands all have in common? They all focus on something bigger than themselves; they show bravery; they make bold decisions that are guided by a bigger vision; they have clear purpose of making meaningful, positive impact.

Bravery pays off

In a recent interview in the FD newspaper, Unilever Europe’s president Hanneke Faber reveals that Unilever’s brands that take a stand grow 46% faster than the rest of the company. In the US, Ben & Jerry's market share is now more than 35%! “By taking a clear position you might antagonize some customers,” says Faber “but the rest become your fans, and that pays off.”

So let’s start encouraging brave

Research carried out for the Brave Brand Rankings shows that brave companies are more likely to be innovative, have great work environments with supportive managers and engaged employees and have organizational structures that promote cooperation and break down barriers.

To encourage bravery we need to create safe spaces where people dare to take a stand; no matter which stand they take. Our tip: start small and encourage bravery around you. Why don’t you try out our “Take a stand” icebreaker during your next team meeting? You can download more detailed instructions here.

After practicing in your team meeting, have your brand take a stand. What is your positive impact? What is your purpose? How can you ensure everyone in the company is aware of that purpose and prepared to fight for it?

You can find out in these cases how we have helped some of our clients to take a stand: Ecover-Method “Brand strategy for the people against dirty”; Dopper “Crystal clear positioning for crystal clear water”; and Nutricia “Define the societal relevance of a baby food company”.

Ready for your next brave step? Sign up for our Brand Purpose Training. Or just pop in our office for a cup of coffee!


Tony's Chocolonely: Raising the chocolate bar for industry change

For years, I’ve been supporting chocolate – and change – maker Tony’s Chocolonely to create their annual report. My kids and my colleagues love that I work for them. Because I always return from meetings with their yummy chocolate in funky flavors. Their bars are a treat, but what inspires me most to work with them is their commitment to creating positive change in the industry. Here’s my take on their key ingredients for positive change!

Crazy people raising the (chocolate) bar

Positive change usually starts with frustration about an issue plus people crazy enough to doing something about it. And this ccompany started just like that. Investigative journalists were shocked to find out how much child labor and slavery there is involved in nearly all chocolate. In 2006, in an attempt to prove that it could be done, they produced 5000 bars of slavery-free chocolate. As this first batch sold out in just a few hours, they turned the experiment into a company.  The company tagline says it all: “Crazy about chocolate, serious about people.”

Partners towards a common goal

A shift to more sustainable business practices is needed at all steps along the chain. From cocoa farmers, chocolate companies and governments, to retailers and consumers. The people at Tony’s understand they cannot transform the cocoa industry by themselves. Tony’s therefore developed a roadmap towards its mission: “Together we make chocolate 100% slave-free”.

The roadmap engages five key actors in the industry to work towards this common goal:

  • Strengthen farmers to increase their income
  • Engage the largest companies in the industry to take action in their supply chains
  • Encourage retailers to leverage their buying power
  • Push governments to adopt and enforce legislation
  • Enable chocofans to raise awareness and spread the message

Scaling up for real movement

To really engage partners along the cocoa chain, Tony’s knows there needs to be a business case every step of the way. Its own story and success provide lots of inspiration to get different parties to act.

At the launch event for its 17/18 annual report that scale became very clear:

  • Over 5,000 farmers benefit from the special premium Tony’s pays, nearly 1,000 farmers are involved in awareness-raising activities to prevent unwanted child labor and slavery;
  • The Netherlands’ largest retailer Albert Heijn announcedit will use Tony’s principles of cooperation for 100% slave-free chocolate for its very successful private label chocolate brand Delicata. World leading chocolate manufacturer Barry Callebaut supports the change process;
  • 5,000 chocofans joined the party, over 8,500 people support Tony’s mission as Serious Friends;
  • And the brand became the market leader in the Netherlands with a market share of 19%. Net revenue grew by 23% to nearly € 45 million and a net profit margin of 4.5%.

Relentless ambition for chocolate and change

Nice numbers for a company that produced its first bar of chocolate just 12 years ago… But they know there’s still a lot of work to be done. Therefore, Team Tony’s continues to work – and party – very hard to increase its own impact by expanding the business to other countries and continuing to drive collaboration in partnership with many others.


Ready to scale-up? Do you have Category Leadership potential?

Having a social start-up means you want to change the world. Your product or service has the potential to create positive change for many. But to have real impact you need to scale-up.

How do you know if your brand is ready for the next step? That is an interesting question. Luckily The Terrace has developed a tool to assess the health of your social brand and it makes clear what you need to do to reach your goal.

A fundamental aspect you need to look at is the so called ‘’Power in the mind’’ of your brand. We have identified two critical checks to see if you are able to get a positive and prominent position in your market.

How single minded is your story?

To get your proposition across you need an extremely clear and simple story. Too many startups lose traction when their fundamental story becomes blurry. A simple but highly effective test is to check if your message can come from one type of personality.

Likewise, a defined corporate culture and a simple and clearly communicated strategy is necessary. You will be amazed by the high rotation of employees at social enterprises. Many times, this is due to unsatisfied employees, having different expectations of the brand and the company. They are disappointed that it was not clear enough how they could help the brand to have more impact.

Important questions you can ask yourself are: How focused is the brand story and sales pitch? How clear are the company values?

Do you have Category Leadership potential?

  • Most social enterprises are too polite. To have impact, you need to shoot for the stars. You must claim some sort of category leadership and act on it.
  • We loved it when Urgenda was the first social enterprise ever to sue the state. It was bold, it was right, and it was a 100% on brand. The same for the bid of VANDEBRON on the Hemkade.
  • Having a clear definition of your category is mandatory. A short cut to get attention is to point out the deadlock in the development of your category and show what you are doing about it.
  • Two important questions you can ask yourself: How many real category leadership actions have been executed? How fit is the company leadership to climb on the stage?

Keep an eye on our website and soon you’ll learn more about how to assess if you’re ready to scale-up! 


Brand Purpose Model: what is the most beautiful thing you can do with your brand?

As a marketer your goal is to win fans and keep them. You do that by making a difference. And by showing what moves you. What you stand for. But what is the best way to get to the core of your brand?

Brand positioning models

Brand positioning models come in many different forms, from the brand diamond, the brand propeller, to the brand sun, etc. All magnificent one-page models that try to cover the essence of a brand. The truth about the brand, meant to be brief and guide colleagues and external contacts. Most are inspired by the brand key: the model developed by the Unilever Marketing Academy to consistently manage their brands internationally. Just one A4, containing all important information in nine clear bullet points. As a marketing strategist I see them in many shapes and forms: from boring Word documents to inspiring works of art. Accurately defining your brand is no easy task. It requires many decisions. Those decisions together define the strength of the brand.

Marketers and brand managers recognize the need for choosing a cutting edge position in the market. Who is the brand, for which target group are you always the best choice, and of course a razor sharp consumer insight. We can’t live without it.

Stand for something as a brand

If you ask me, the brand key is hopelessly worn out. In times like these, where what used to be rattles, we need the courage to let go of the old and embrace the new. The brand key is not sufficient anymore because it doesn’t take into account the world around the brand. Both the internal organization as well as the external stakeholders need to receive adequate attention. Next to the functional and emotional advantages consumers increasingly expect “like-mindedness”. Choosing for a brand that shares their values. A brand that doesn’t just stand for something, but also cares about something! And I’m not talking about a briefing that was sent to the advertising agency ordering to “come up with an authentic campaign”.

I believe that brands should decide on how they can improve and enrich people’s lives. How they can expose and contribute to social issues. Current position models fall short in addressing this.

We need an inspirational model that helps marketers to proudly carry their profession and helps companies to create true value. Brands have the power to encourage people to make better, healthier and more sustainable choices every day. Brands can help to redefine our vision on quality of life. Brands can guide us, by hitting the sustainable route. Brands can enthusiasm people for this route. They can trigger positive change in the behavior of people.

The Terrace’s ‘Brand Purpose Model’

As a warm-up we start with the question: “what is the most beautiful thing you can do with your brand?” Bam! It provides food for thought and breaks with the laws of conventional marketing mechanisms. This is your chance to think something about something, to be opinioned. Stand for something. And that is exactly what customers expect from you. That’s how you create preference.

The “Brand Purpose Model” by The Terrace offers companies a holistic view on their business to sharply define the purpose. In that process the marketer doesn’t just need his or her own team, but also colleagues from PR/PA, Sales & CSR are needed. Of course having the general director at the table is highly desirable. Without connecting these different disciplines, no shared “purpose” will arise in the organization. Any social activity will just be a little something on the side. Your customers will see right through it.

How it works

We work from the outside-in. Based on insights and needs from different angles we determine the business value and the social impact that fits the brand. The target group and competitors follow next.

Of course you have to know who you’re up against in the market. However, successful brands create a cooperative environment. Take for example cooperation in the supply chain; for marketers, the transition from a linear to a circular economy means that your products will come from two sides, from you and to you. That’s not something a company can manage on its own. Cooperation is crucially important. This includes your target group, who has become more conscious and can arrange more things themselves. Granting others something is the key.

Everyone knows it, character can’t be copied. Why do so few brands of today show what they really stand for? A strong brand purpose provides focus for successful collaboration and innovation.

What does your brand stand for?

Leontine Gast